1.08.2007

"Spit Happens"...

... that's what the nurse said to me quoting a popular bib to explain Tortellino's vomiting. She said it with a tone I'd heard before.

A nurse used the same I've-been-throught-this-and-I-know-more-than-you-you-neurotic-first-time-mom tone when I was in labor and asked for an epidural. "You're a first timer, it'll be a while," she said. So, I went thorugh accelarated induced labor without any pain-killers save the last ten minutes when the guy came to stick a needle in my back "stay still!" he shrilled while trying to stick the syringe in his target. "I can't, I'm contracting. Get this thing out of me, noowww!" Only ten more minutes would pass and Tortellino popped out with a bang.

This time, that tone wasn't going to work.

I wasn't going to take any flak.

"Look, he's in the 25 percemtile for weight at 3 months, while his height is 100 percentile. He doesn't 'spit-up' he VOMITS. Not just a little bit, everything. Then he arches back in pain. He keeps kicking his legs out and it seems like he's a 'talker' at three months but he's complaining about the pain. I don't have a cholichy baby. I have a sick baby. Now go get me the doctor.

Please."

That was my 7th visit in 4 months to find out what the heck was going on. I'd read-up this time and asked.. "Could this be acid reflux?" we tried a combination of medications and within three days I had a different baby. Tortellino was calm, tranquil, happy.. and quiet. He slept through the night and stopped kicking in the air.

15 months later and we're sitting in the GI specialists' office in Austria.

"He isn't getting better. In fact, he routinely gets worse when his weight exceeds the medication or when we travel to a different time zone and the rhythim of his medication changes. He starts to vomit again."

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting"I'm surprised he hasn't been operated on," she said. "I keep reading articles that American doctors operate for these at just three monts. We wait 'til two years, here."

Now will begin a series of tests - an x-ray to see what's going on and PH monitoring (bear modelling the procedure to the right), which involves Tortellino going around for 24 hours with a probe going down to his stomach through his nose and being attached to a little machine that is carried in a back-pack that records the acidity and number of refluxes.

These tests should tell us whether the reflux, caused by a malformed stomach valve, will either reslove itself or will need operation. Either way, he'll finally be able to get off his medication - that he's been taking fro 15 months of his life.

Sometimes it's good to be insistant and find out why spit happens.

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